In Memoriam: Reading Rescue Benefactor and Board Member, Benedict Silverman
reading rescue logo

Families

Hello Families!  Thank you for visiting our site to learn more about Reading Rescue.

If your child is currently enrolled in our program please continue reading to learn more about our student Take Home Activity.

If you are visiting our website to learn how you can become an Instructor or to get your child’s school involved feel free to email us: info@readingrescue.org

As a family member of a Reading Rescue student, here are some things you can do to help your child take advantage of our wonderful program:

  • Ensure your child is in school each day to receive tutoring. It is very important that your child be present for the tutoring every day.  Your child’s instructor will have a lesson prepared especially for your child.  If your child is absent, the instructor will not be able to work with another child because she/he won’t have a lesson ready for any other child.  Excessive absences may cause your child to be discontinued from the program so that another child may benefit.
  • Each evening, take 5 minutes to celebrate and to praise your child’s reading. Your child’s instructor will send home a plastic folder every day that will contain:
  1.  A sentence your child composed and wrote, with the help of the instructor, the previous day. The same sentence, cut into pieces, will also be in the envelope.
    • Homework Activity:  Help your child put the cut-up sentence back together several times, rereading it each time. Have your child check his/her work against the intact sentence. (Sentences and the cut-up sentence words can be kept at home for additional practice.)
  2. 1-2 books that your child has read with his/her instructor.
    • Homework Activity:  Let your child read aloud the book/s to you and discuss them, if you can. Encourage your child to point to the words while reading, and to use the strategies his/her tutor has taught. After reading, you can ask your child to retell a story and ask for his/her opinions, such as, “What did you like best about this story?” If it’s a nonfiction book, you can ask your child about the main ideas in the book, such as, “What was this book teaching you about?”

Celebrate your child’s efforts on both activities and let your child know how PROUD you are of his/her daily progress in learning to read!

 Folder & contents2
Folder & contents3